Modern Drumset Techniques For Today's Worship Drummer

Steph Macleod – Give Me A Sight O Saviour

This is another video I was involved in recently, featuring acclaimed Scottish Christian singer-songwriter Steph Macleod. It was great fun! Here’s what Steph said about the song:

“This song was inspired by the original hymn composed and written by Katherine Kelly (1869-1942) and was then rearranged, rewritten and a new song composed. I found the lyrics in the back of an old hymn book, and the lines, ‘make me understand’ really cried out to me. We often speak of the price Christ paid for us on the cross, but these words ask Him to make us understand that sacrifice. It’s mind blowing. Essentially we just wanted to worship. Here I am with my band The Second Mile Society performing a live take, recorded by Christy Mearns and Garry Boyle. This production was also made possible by working with my partner charity Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF).

The original lyrics:

Give me a sight, O Savior,
Of Thy wondrous love to me,
Of the love that brought Thee down to earth,
To die on Calvary.

Oh, make me understand it,
Help me to take it in,
What it meant to Thee, the Holy One,
To bear away my sin.

Was it the nails, O Savior,
That bound Thee to the tree?
Nay, ’twas Thine everlasting love,
Thy love for me, for me.

Oh, wonder of all wonders,
That through Thy death for me,
My open sins, my secret sins,
Can all forgiven be.

Then melt my heart, O Savior,
Bend me, yea, break me down,
Until I own Thee Conqueror,
And Lord and Sov’reign crown.”

This song was inspired by the original hymn composed and written by Katherine Kelly (1869-1942) and was then rearranged, rewritten and a new song composed. I found the lyrics in the back of an old hymn book, and the lines, ‘make me understand’ really cried out to me. We often speak of the price Christ paid for us on the cross, but these words ask Him to make us understand that sacrifice. It’s mind blowing. Essentially we just wanted to worship. Here I am with my band The Second Mile Society performing a live take, recorded by Christy Mearns and Garry Boyle. This production was also made possible by working with my partner charity Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF).

https://www.maf-uk.org

The original lyrics:

Give me a sight, O Savior,
Of Thy wondrous love to me,
Of the love that brought Thee down to earth,
To die on Calvary.

Oh, make me understand it,
Help me to take it in,
What it meant to Thee, the Holy One,
To bear away my sin.

Was it the nails, O Savior,
That bound Thee to the tree?
Nay, ’twas Thine everlasting love,
Thy love for me, for me.

Oh, wonder of all wonders,
That through Thy death for me,
My open sins, my secret sins,
Can all forgiven be.

Then melt my heart, O Savior,
Bend me, yea, break me down,
Until I own Thee Conqueror,
And Lord and Sov’reign crown.

New Scottish Hymns on BBC Songs of Praise

It was great to be featured as part of the New Scottish Hymns for BBC Songs of Praise earlier this year. Greg shares about the heart behind his song-writing.

www.newscottishhymns.com

“Scottish Hymn-writer Greg de Blieck talks about his music ministry, New Scottish Hymns on an episode of Songs of Praise aired on 28th June 2015.”

*This content belongs to the BBC and Waddell Media. If you wish for this to be removed please contact [email protected]*

New Scottish Hymns – You’re The Shepherd (Live)

You’re the Shepherd’, taken from New Scottish Hymns Live Streaming Event, 24th January 2015.

Sheet Music, Lyrics and more information on the project can be found at www.newscottishhymns.com.

You’re the shepherd, we’re the sheep
You won’t slumber, though we sleep
Oh what love our saviour shows
To the little ones he knows
We are guilty, You are good
We fell short, but You withstood
For Your father’s holy name
You endured and overcame

We were helpless in our sin
You forgave and took us in
Though our hearts still turn from You
Yet with patience You pursue

You’re the teacher, we are taught
By Your precious blood we’re bought
You’re the healer we are healed
By Your cross our hope is sealed
We’re forgiven by Your blood
Orphans called as sons of God
Brought from darkness into light
Washed in red and clothed in white

Yours the triumph, Yours the throne
Praise and glory, Yours alone
Tongues of angels, songs of men
Let the heav’ns resound again

Stuart Townend on writing ‘In Christ Alone’

Taken from Stuart Townend’s website

In Christ Alone

In November 2000 I was at a worship conference in Eastbourne, and introduced through a mutual friend to Keith Getty, who I had heard was a terrific melody writer. We met up for a coffee, and he promised to send me a CD of song ideas.

I didn’t really think any more about it. Then a CD arrived in the post containing three song ideas played on a piano. I didn’t get past the first melody, because I was so taken with it – it was quite hymn-like, but with a beautiful celtic lilt – I immediately started writing down some lines on the life of Christ.

Often lyrics come in quite a haphazard way. You write loads of couplets, then re-write some, then gradually piece it together to give it continuity and shape. The process for “In Christ alone” was much more linear. Once I’d worked out the rhyming structure (it felt like the song had better shape if lines 1 and 3 rhymed as well as the more usual 2 and 4), I started working on the first verse, setting the scene with a fairly subjective exploration of what Christ means to the Christian. Then I as I worked through the life, death and resurrection of Christ, I was getting more and more excited and emotional, and verse 4 kind of spilled out as a declaration of the impact of these amazing events in our lives.

Within a couple of days I had the whole lyric, sent it to Keith, he suggested a couple of changes, and “In Christ alone” was finished.

I think maybe one of the reasons the song is so popular is that it can stir up our emotions (I still often cry like an old softie when I sing it) – but the emotion is not the central feature of the song. Because the lyrics stay fixed on the unchanging truths of our salvation, it not only provokes emotion, but engenders faith, strengthening our spirits, not just stirring our souls.