Modern Drumset Techniques For Today's Worship Drummer

Steph Macleod – Give Me A Sight O Saviour

This is another video I was involved in recently, featuring acclaimed Scottish Christian singer-songwriter Steph Macleod. It was great fun! Here’s what Steph said about the song:

“This song was inspired by the original hymn composed and written by Katherine Kelly (1869-1942) and was then rearranged, rewritten and a new song composed. I found the lyrics in the back of an old hymn book, and the lines, ‘make me understand’ really cried out to me. We often speak of the price Christ paid for us on the cross, but these words ask Him to make us understand that sacrifice. It’s mind blowing. Essentially we just wanted to worship. Here I am with my band The Second Mile Society performing a live take, recorded by Christy Mearns and Garry Boyle. This production was also made possible by working with my partner charity Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF).

The original lyrics:

Give me a sight, O Savior,
Of Thy wondrous love to me,
Of the love that brought Thee down to earth,
To die on Calvary.

Oh, make me understand it,
Help me to take it in,
What it meant to Thee, the Holy One,
To bear away my sin.

Was it the nails, O Savior,
That bound Thee to the tree?
Nay, ’twas Thine everlasting love,
Thy love for me, for me.

Oh, wonder of all wonders,
That through Thy death for me,
My open sins, my secret sins,
Can all forgiven be.

Then melt my heart, O Savior,
Bend me, yea, break me down,
Until I own Thee Conqueror,
And Lord and Sov’reign crown.”

This song was inspired by the original hymn composed and written by Katherine Kelly (1869-1942) and was then rearranged, rewritten and a new song composed. I found the lyrics in the back of an old hymn book, and the lines, ‘make me understand’ really cried out to me. We often speak of the price Christ paid for us on the cross, but these words ask Him to make us understand that sacrifice. It’s mind blowing. Essentially we just wanted to worship. Here I am with my band The Second Mile Society performing a live take, recorded by Christy Mearns and Garry Boyle. This production was also made possible by working with my partner charity Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF).

https://www.maf-uk.org

The original lyrics:

Give me a sight, O Savior,
Of Thy wondrous love to me,
Of the love that brought Thee down to earth,
To die on Calvary.

Oh, make me understand it,
Help me to take it in,
What it meant to Thee, the Holy One,
To bear away my sin.

Was it the nails, O Savior,
That bound Thee to the tree?
Nay, ’twas Thine everlasting love,
Thy love for me, for me.

Oh, wonder of all wonders,
That through Thy death for me,
My open sins, my secret sins,
Can all forgiven be.

Then melt my heart, O Savior,
Bend me, yea, break me down,
Until I own Thee Conqueror,
And Lord and Sov’reign crown.

Chris Tomlin – God of Angel Armies (Whom Shall I Fear)

And another ‘Church Drummer’ cover! It’s been a few months but here’s the latest one: Chris Tomlin’s ‘God of Angel Armies (Whom Shall I Fear).’ A great song from his 2013 album ‘Burning Lights.’ Nice drumming from both Paul Mabury and Travis Nunn throughout the album. Enjoy!

Paul Baloche – Our God Saves

February’s new drum cover, the 2014 version of Paul Baloche’s song (originally released in 2007 on his album of the same name) ‘Our God Saves.’ Enjoy!

New Drum Cover: Hillsong Y&F – Wake

My latest drum cover – Hillsong Y&F’s ‘Wake!’ Check it out!

 

Your Grace Finds Me

My latest cover, Matt Redman’s ‘Your Grace Finds Me’ from his 2013 album of the same name.

New Drum Cover: Here for You

Here is a brand new drum cover, the first Christian Worship track in these 2014 videos! Filmed by CAM Creative.

Hello!

Hello, and welcome to my website, The Church Drummer! Thanks for visiting. I hope you enjoy it and get a lot out of it!  Don’t hesitate to leave your own comments, but, please also remember to be courteous! Whilst this is a public forum, it is one that seeks to promote the worship and glory of Jesus Christ both in content and attitude. Thanks for your co-operation and enjoy the site!

Bob Kauflin’s Top Ten Reasons to Share Musical Opinions Humbly

Taken from Bob Kauflin’s website, Worship Matters. His book title of the same name fantastic and I would (humbly!) recommend to all people in worship teams.

 

I’ve been musing recently about how we express our musical opinions. Why do we feel so strongly about songs, bands, and styles? And why do we draw conclusions so quickly? Nope. Don’t like it. That stinks. I can’t stand that kind of music. You like that stuff? Is there anything wrong with raving about the music/artists we love and being swift to trash those we despise?

If we’re Christians, yes. Let me suggest ten reasons why musical forbearance might be good for our souls.

1. Being a self-appointed music critic is often just a sign of pride.Using outrageous or exaggerated words to put down certain songs, styles, or artists can be a symptom of selfishness, laziness, or arrogance. We don’t want to spend time investigating whether or not our assessment is accurate because we’re too busy sharing our opinions. (Prov. 18:2)

2. Music doesn’t define us. Why do we become offended when someone critiques our favorite song, group, or style of music? Because they’re insulting “our” music, which means they’re insulting us. That’s idolatry. Music isn’t our life — Christ is. (Col. 3:4).

3. Great songs don’t always sound great the first time through.Some songs require repeated listenings to appreciate their value.  Albums and songs often grow on us over time. Is all the best music always instantly accessible or appealing? I hope not.

4. The introduction to a song isn’t the same thing as the song.The first twenty seconds of a song usually doesn’t represent the whole song. It just introduces it. Deciding we don’t like a song from the start can keep us from hearing something we might truly enjoy or benefit from.

5. Listening to music the masses have never heard of doesn’t make us better. Some of us derive a particular joy in finding and listening to obscure, undiscovered artists. As if being unknown was admirable in and of itself. Some bands are undiscovered because they’re not very good. And if we do happen to discover a talented unknown band, it’s an opportunity to serve others, not look down on them.

6. Listening to music that is massively popular doesn’t make us better. This is the opposite craving of the previous point. It’s the mindset that says if the song or artist hasn’t been on the radio, at the top of the charts, or on TV, it’s not worth listening to.

7. Learning to appreciate unfamiliar music is one way to prefer others. Why does everyone have to like the music I like? What might I learn about my friends by patiently seeking to understand why they like the music they do? (Phil. 2:4)

8. Learning to like other kinds of music can open my eyes to God’s creativity. In his book, Music Through the Eyes of Faith, Harold Best addresses musical elitists. “Among all this stuff that needs aesthetic redeeming, there is also goodness, a whole lot of integrity and honesty, from which they themselves can learn.” (p. 89) That means I can actually enjoy music that is less sophisticated than what I’d ordinarily listen to.

9. We may have to eat our words. It’s happened more than a few times. I mouth off about how bad a song is, and later on start to think it’s actually pretty good. Or I tear up a song on my blog and later find myself talking to a person who loves it or the person who wrote it. Oops.

10. We might be missing an opportunity to be grateful for God’s gifts. Our tendency is to assume that God’s gifts all look and sound the same. They don’t. What would happen if the first time we heard a song we sought to be grateful rather than critical?

Let me be clear. No song is above evaluation and there are truly bad songs. We just might serve others and ourselves more effectively if we expressed our musical opinions with a little more grace.

[originally posted Dec. 7, 2008]


Official Worship Signals

Quite a funny poster! Which one are you?

Prof. Donald Macleod on Worship

A few years back I sent Prof. Donald Macleod,  former Principal of the Free Church of Scotland College an e-mail about “the heart of worship.”  I was intrigued on his opinions as one of the most respected Scottish theologians in recent times. I also have a strong connection with the Free Church myself.

Here are the questions I asked Professor Macleod:

With regards to Worship Music, how important is it for a musician leading the praises to God to know about a “theology of worship”? What does that look like?
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